Jello Shot Stadiums Are the New Snack Stadiums

I think we can all agree, stuff tastes better when it looks like other stuff.

Case in point: snack stadiums. A few years ago, America fell hard (as only we could) for the kitschy, Pinterest-friendly trend of stacking, spreading, and otherwise cajoling football-friendly fare (think subs, chips, wings, and all manners of dip) into a structure resembling a football stadium. If you consumed any amount of social media this time last year, you probably couldn’t escape the endless images of snack stadiums—some impressive, others not so much—that graced tables at Big Game viewing parties across the country. 

Well, we here at KegWorks decided the snack stadium trend was in need of a little innovation. And since what you drink during the Big Game is at least as important as what you eat, it made sense (at least in our alcohol-addled minds) that the next era of stadium-shaped snackery should come with a buzz.

Behold, the Jello shot stadium:

stadium made of Jello shots


Thanks to our innovative spirit, you, too, can make this TOTALLY PRACTICAL Big Game centerpiece at home. All you need is our
handy template, some wood, glue, nails, a 21” x 15” jelly roll pan (for your “turf”), Jello shot mixes of your choosing, a big handful of manhours, and enough people to (safely, please!) consume somewhere in the vicinity of 386 Jello shots. To contain the Jello, we used one-ounce plastic shot glasses, but you can use whatever vessel works best for your purposes. Just remember, your stadium will hold more or less shot cups depending on the size you choose.

If you do decide to tackle this project, here are some tips and general comments to help you along the way:

  • Clear out plenty of room in your fridge. All that Jello needs a place to set up.

fridge full of jello

 

  • Buy more Jello mix than you think you’ll need, because running out mid-project is the pits. For the blue and orange shots pictured, we prepared about 30 ounces of gelatin, which ended up making about 60 more shots than we ended up using on the structure. For the lime green turf, we prepared 12 ounces of gelatin.

jello shot mix

 

  • Place the individual shot glasses on serving trays before you fill them. That way, you can easily transport them to the fridge. Trays have the added bonus of being stackable, which will help mitigate any fridge-space issues.

Serving tray of Jello shots

 

  • Once the Jello is made according to the package directions or using one of our delectable recipes, transfer the mixture to a large, spouted pitcher so you can easily pour the liquid into the shot glasses you lined up.

pouring jello for shots

 

  • Once the shots make it to the fridge, strategically place warning signs to prevent curious co-workers, roommates, significant others, or family members from putting their grubby fingers in your Jello.

Jello warning sign

 

  • If you are going to line and number your Jello turf with white frosting and want to do a better job than we did, we recommended thinning store-bought frosting with a little water so it pipes more easily and investing in decent-quality, seamless piping bags that won’t burst from the pressure and get frosting all over your hands. It was a messy—albeit delicious—problem for us.

frosting detail jello turf

 

  • Have plenty of hands available to transfer your Jello shots to the stadium once set. This will make everything go a lot faster. 

team places jello on stadium

 

  • Be prepared for and fully accepting of the fact that your house will be overwhelmingly perfumed with the scent of ambiguous, artificial fruits. As one of our co-workers noted during the building process, “It smells like blue in here.”

We hope this provides you some inspiration for your Big Game party. If you do go the Jello shot stadium route, we hope you share your results with us!

 

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